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Reeghan Finlay

Reeghan is a Gunggari Umbie (woman) from Mitchell in south-west Queensland.

Reeghan is passionate about her community, and about education.

"I believe education is the key to a brighter future," she says.

The work she is currently undertaking at Yugambeh Museum is really community orientated. She has had the pleasure of working closely with her community in Mitchell and communities in Brisbane and surrounds.

"I was inspired to do this work by my Great Aunt, Irene Ryder. She has taught the Gunggari language at schools in Mitchell since the 1980s which is a great accomplishment for an Aboriginal woman with limited education."

Reeghan didn't believe she would have graduated high school without the support from family and friends , she even won 'Aboriginal of the Year'. Whilst still at high school Reeghan completed an 18-month traineeship at Seaworld Nara Resort.

At Yugambeh museum with the assistance of fellow staff she curated an exhibition called Nalingu Ulbulla - Many Spirits.

"Working at Yugambeh has inspired me to find out as much as I can about my culture which led to me being voted as an applicant for a Gunggari Native Title claim. This was an honour as I was chosen by my Elders, family and friends."

"My advice for young Indigenous people is to get an education because it is vital in today's society. Try to be your best at anything and everything and DON"T BE SHAME."

Reeghan is also proud to have been chosen to participate in the Indigenous Youth Leadership Program which allowed her to be a member of the Inaugural Eric Deeral Indigenous Youth Parliament.

"I met so many inspirational people and it was a life changing experience. I learnt things that I can take back to my community."

To get to where she is, Reeghan had to overcome her greatest challenge in her shyness.

"I am very proud to call myself an Aboriginal because our culture is still strong today and we are very proud people. I have still got a long way to go and a lot more to learn."

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