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Joshua Creamer

A strong family grounding in social justice has led Joshua Creamer towards a successful law career. Josh, a young Wannyi and Kalkadoon man, grew up in Mount Isa and later Yeppoon before moving to the Gold Coast to study law. He found that, despite the challenges of living away from family, pursuing an education opened up a new world of possibilities.

In 2004 Josh was selected as a delegate in the Oxfam International Youth Parliament. He says the application process was tough but the effort was worth it.
"When I was there I thought, how amazing is this? There were 300 people from around the world, all working towards making change in their communities."

Josh's experiences over the 3 years as a delegate inspired him to keep being involved in social justice projects, including the International Youth Leadership Event and the Brooklyn Event. After finishing his commitments as a delegate to the International Youth Parliament, Josh was invited back to attend the 2007 Oxfam International Youth Parliament as a facilitator and mentor, helping to run the Parliament's third sitting.

In 2008 Josh was awarded Griffith University's Rubin Hurricane Carter Award for Commitment to Social Justice. "It was the first time I'd won an award and it made me realise it's nice to be recognised for what you do," says Josh, whose family came down to the Gold Coast to be with him when he received the award and celebrate his achievements.

Joshua is President of the Queensland Indigenous Lawyers and Law Students Association and currently practices as a Barrister in Brisbane. His practice areas include Native Title, Commercial Law, Indigenous Law and Human Rights. He is engaged by a number of Indigenous groups in Queensland as Counsel in their native title determination applications before the Federal Court.

"It's interesting to be Indigenous and be working in native title; seeing the complexities of the law, what the law can achieve and what Indigenous people want it to achieve," he says. "I want to be able to contribute towards improving the situation of Indigenous people-that's a never-ending goal for me."

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